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Sail types

It all begins with your overall need and your sailing preference. To us, every sail is unique and must match your sailing adventures and dreams. Find inspiration to match your dream and sailing preference in our 6 segments.

DJI 0540 1

Sail needs

Our qualified Elvstrøm SailPoints will guide you and help you measure your boat if the rig has been changed since the original set-up.

Main Sails

The main sail is always in use when sailing, meaning it has to cover a wide spectre of wind angles and forces. The shape in the main sail consists of three elements: A designed shape, the stretch of the material and the shape of the mast. Combining these three elements makes the finished product.

Softer (often woven) materials stretch more than laminates or membranes/ EPEX do. This means that softer materials perform better over a larger range of wind condition, where the harder ones are more specific. While sailing, the mainsail is connected to the mast, and usually the boat also has a backstay. A tight backstay will bend the mast and depower the main - good in a heavy breeze, while a straighter mast gives you a deeper and more powerful sail, which comes in handy in lighter conditions.

We have all types of mainsails in our portfolio, from cruising conventional mainsails in crosscut woven materials that are suitable for coastal sailing in different materials and cuts up to our lightest and most stretch resistant racing sails. Mainsails can also furl into the mast or boom. These sail types can be delivered with or without battens. Full battens will improve the boats performance for two main reasons. The battens obviously support a positive roach that result in a larger sail area than if not battens are used.

The other big advantage when using full battens is that these will work as reefing points. When you furl the sail so that the batten is close to the extrusion, the luff will be stretched, and you have a flat and efficient reefed sail.

Multihulls as well as some monohulls are equipped with so called “fat head” or “square head” mainsails. This design adds sail area, and another effect of the wide top is that they are aerodynamically more efficient in most conditions. These designs do however not work unless your boat either does not have a backstay or is equipped with double backstays where the leeward one is loose, so it does not conflict with the leech of the sail.

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Main sails for conventional mast, furling boom and furling in-mast

Click the boxes below to read more.

Conventionalmain Shortbattens Elvstromsails

CONVENTIONAL MAIN

For monohulls

A conventional mainsail is for keelboats without furling systems. It can be delivered with various options. Shorter battens in the lower parts of the sail make the trimming and depowering easier. If you are looking to cross the oceans and sail downwind for long periods, short battens also mean less chafe against the rig and spreaders. Horizontal full battens in a conventional mainsail help keep the shape of the sail.

Fathead Elvstromsails

FATHEAD

Square headed main – for mono and multihulls

A fathead mainsail is designed with a square head, making the tuning easier. When the wind increases, the top of the sail will twist, and the result is a flatter sail. In light wind the extra area gives the boat more power. The square head mainsail is with full battens, which make the sail stable when sailing.

Pinhead New

PINHEAD

For cruising multihulls

A pinhead mainsail is the conventional mainsail for multihull boats. The head of this sail is always attached to the headboard car, so fewer movable parts than for the fat head. However, not having a backstay on the multihull, it is room for a large leech roach securing balance to the boat.

Racemain

RACE MAIN

100 % custom built

A conventional race mainsail is designed with shape stability and custom details to match your racing boat and rigging. This mainsail will be 100 % custom built to your needs and ambitions. Several options are available once you are in the final steps of configuring your sail with your sail maker.

Inboomfurling Elvstromsails

IN-BOOM FURLING MAIN

Built to fit your boom

An in-boom furling mainsail is custom made to fit various furling boom types. The horizontal full battens help keep the shape and ensure that the furling into the boom runs without problems. The lowest battens are also working as reefing point as they stretch out the reefed down mainsail.

Inmastmain Nobattens Elvstromsails

FURLING MAIN (no battens)

Basic in-mast-furling

An in-mast furling mainsail with no battens is the simplest sail within the range of in-mast furling mainsails. It is cost effective and solid and possible to furl into all furling masts, including the ones with a narrow opening.

Inmastmain Shortbattens Elvstromsails

FURLING MAIN (short battens)

Basic in-mast furling short battened

An in-mast furling mainsail with short battens can be built with a straight leech, which gives a larger and more efficient sail than without the battens. Normally this sail will also fit into all masts, also the ones with narrow opening, as the battens are flat. It is a cost effective and solid sail.

Emsbase

EMS BASE FURLING MAIN

Efficient also with reduced area

An EMS base is an in-mast furling mainsail with full continuous vertical battens. The continuous vertical battens are used as reefing points, stretching the reefed luff, and making the sail flat and efficient.

EMS Elvstromsails

EMS FURLING MAIN

In-mast with full battens

An EMS is an in-mast furling mainsail with full continuous vertical battens. The continuous vertical battens with carbon top provide support for the leech, whether the sail is fully deployed or reefed. The battens are also to be used as reefing points, stretching the reefed luff, and making the sail flat and efficient.

 

EMS Max

EMS MAX FURLING MAIN

In-mast with extra features

The EMS max sail is the cruising in mast furling mainsail that also win races. The sail area can be designed as a conventional mainsail, but with several extra features. The continuous vertical battens with carbon top provide optimal support for the leech, whether the sail is fully deployed or reefed. The short intermediate battens have the same function. The full battens are also to be used as reefing points, stretching the reefed luff, and making the sail flat and efficient.

Emsfatfurl Elvstromsails (1)

FATFURL FURLING MAIN

In-mast with optimum shape

The FatFurl in-mast furling mainsail is an Elvstrøm Sails innovation. It is designed with optimum shape and maximum sail area. The full vertical battens with a carbon top provide maximum support for the leech, whether the sail is fully deployed or reefed. The full battens are also to be used as reefing points, stretching the reefed luff, and making the sail flat and efficient. The short inter-mediate battens further strengthen the leech.

Fatfurlxl

FATFURL XL FURLING MAIN

In-mast with wider headboard

The FatFurl XL sail design is characterized by an XL headboard. The upper 1/3 of the roach is maximized further and crowned with a wider headboard so the top of the sail will open more and twist easily which gives the boat more power. The continuous vertical integrated battens with carbon top provide maximum support for the leech, whether the sail is fully deployed or reefed. The short intermediate battens have the same function.

Head Sails

The headsail(s) is normally used when sailing upwind or at least with apparent wind lower than 90 degrees. These are attached in one or another way to the forestay where the most common one is a furling system, but hooks either of metal or soft hanks in dyneema as well as zipper along the forestay can also be used. Many racing boats are using a twin groove foil to be able to change sails without having to drop one sail fully before setting another.

Jib and genoa - two types of headsails

The jibs are shorter in the foot and sheeted in front of the shrouds or even further forward on a self-tacking track. The genoas are wider, they are passing the shrouds and is sheeted on a genoa track in front of the cockpit. Furling sails are most common, and these sails can be reefed in heavy wind by partly being furled in.

A headsail can also be used on deep angles supported by a pole on the opposite side of the mainsail. The shape of sails comes from 3 elements; the designed shape, stretch of material and the shape of the mast. Soft (often woven) materials will stretch more than laminated or EPEX sails will, and for that reason the low stretch materials will perform better over a larger range of wind conditions.

As for the mainsail, you can tune the shape of the sail by reducing or increasing the sag of the forestay. Less backstay tension result in increased sag which leads to a deeper sail that performs well in light breeze. In heavier conditions more backstay tension will result in a flatter sail. Moving the sheet car backwards will flatten the sail and forward will make the sail deeper.

Hallberg Rassy 50 Yacht

Head sails non-furling and furling

Jib C2 Elvstromsails

JIB

The racing headsail

Generally, the jib is the working headsail for upwind sailing in most wind conditions. A jib is sheeted in front of the shrouds which gives the possibility of being trimmed with a narrow sheeting angle. The sail may be with or without battens. The jib C2 is the medium, race upwind headsail for boats set up for headsails sheeted in front of the shrouds. Typically, it will “overlap by 100-106%. maximum size and built to perform at max on upwind between 8 and 18 knots TWS. C1 is the lighter and fuller jib, C3 is heavier and smaller in area.

Genoa M Elvstromsails

GENOA

The overlapping headsail

A genoa is a sail that overlaps the mast. Normally the LP (perpendicular measurement from clew to luff) is between 135- 150% of the boats J-measurement. This makes the sail efficient in light and medium winds. Since the sail overlaps the rig, battens are not possible. The luff can be attached to the forestay with foil, metal hooks or soft hanks of different types. A light genoa is built for lighter wind conditions with lighter cloth and fuller shape. The heavy genoa is smaller and heavier built.

 

 

 

Selftackjib

SELFTACKING JIB

The jib for self-tacking track

The self-tacking jib is the working headsail for upwind in most wind conditions, when there is no furling gear to handle the sail, and you are going to sheet it on your self-tacking track. The sail may be with or without battens. A sail with battens will be wider in the upper parts and thus more efficient.

Furling Jib New

FURLING JIB

The working headsail for furling

The furling jib is the working headsail for upwind sailing in most wind conditions. It is sheeted in front of the shrouds which gives the opportunity of being trimmed with a narrow sheeting angle. The sail may be with or without battens. If you choose battens, they will be parallel with the forestay to make the furling work perfectly. A sail with battens will be slightly bigger than without battens.

Fatfurl Jib Elvstromsails

FATFURL JIB

A furling headsail with big roach

The fatfurl jib is the working headsail for upwind sailing in most wind conditions. It is sheeted in front of the shrouds which gives the opportunity of trimming with a narrow sheeting angle. The sail is supplied with both full and short battens that runs parallel to the forestay to make the furling work perfectly. The full battens in front of the sail give the opportunity to design the sail with a large area in the upper part of the sail, which again gives a more efficient sail for all conditions; more powerful in light winds because of the larger sail area and more “self-tuning” in heavy winds because the big roach in the upper parts will twist and flatten the sail in heavy winds.

Sefltacking Furlingjib Elvstromsails

SELFTACKING FURLING JIB

The furling jib for self-tacking track

The self-tacking furling jib is the working headsail for upwind in most wind conditions when the usage is handled with furling gear. The sail is sheeted on your self-tacking track. The sail may be with or without battens. If you choose battens, they will be parallel with the forestay to make the furling work perfectly. A sail with battens will be slightly bigger than without. For many boats/rigs the self-tacking jib may be small in light conditions.

 

Sefltackingfatfurljib

SELFTACKING FATFURL JIB

Jib with big roach for self-tacking track

The self-tacking fat furl jib is the working headsail for upwind in most wind conditions. The sail is sheeted on your self-tacking track. The sail is supplied with both full and short battens that runs parallel to the forestay to make the furling work perfectly. The full battens in front of the sail make it possible to design the sail with a large area in the upper parts of the sail resulting in a more efficient sail for all conditions. More powerful in light winds because of the larger sail area and more “self-tuning” in heavy winds because the big roach in the upper parts will twist and flatten the sail in heavy winds.

Furling Genoa Elvstromsails

FURLING GENOA

The overlapping headsail for furling

The furling genoa is the primary headsail for boats built for and with a set-up for overlapping headsails. When used fully unfurled, it gives the boat power in light and medium winds. The furling genoa can be delivered with a reefing compensator that makes the shape of the sail flatter and efficient also in reefed condition, when the wind increases.

 

Heavyweather Jib Elvstromsails

HEAVY WEATHER JIB

The working headsail for heavy weather

The Heavy Weather Jib is perfect for heavy upwind sailing, sparing the working headsail from the toughest conditions. The flat shape and reduced area make heavy weather sailing fun as the boat is well balanced and easy to handle. The sail can be used on the primary forestay or with hooks on an extra forestay. In some cases it is also possible to install an AT cable in the luff.

Downwind

Downwind sailing with a proper downwind sail is arguably the most comfortable sort of sailing one can do. Often nicknamed 'champagne sailing', the downwind sailing is just cruising at its prime. The family of sails for downwind use is substantial, and if you are a cruising sailor you should consult your sailmaker to find the best fit for your boat and ambitions.

Symmetric spinnakers are used on a spinnaker pole that you move from one side to the other when gybing. These sails are less commonly used these days, but do offer a wide range when it comes to be used on different wind angles. Asymmetric spinnakers, often called genakers, are tacked in the centerline when in use - often on a bowsprit. So when gybing the clew corner is moved to the opposite side of the boat. This sail can be used together with a spisok for easier handling, or also a furling system that furls the sail in from top to bottom.

We also have a sailtype named the Furlstrøm. This is also a furling sail, but it is furled around an anti-torsion cable from bottom to top. A Blue Water runner is a sail optimized for easy sailing on deep angles. It is a furling sail, which combines the properties of a downwind sail with easy handling as it furls. This also makes the Blue Water Runner a great choice for short or even singlehanded sailing.

Webdehler 30OD Www

Downwind sails flying and flying furling

Spi Icon

SYMMETRIC SPINNAKER

All-round spinnaker

The Spinnaker is an all-round spinnaker with optimized shape and size to make the sail stable for easy sailing. In light winds you may come up as high as 110 TWA, and apart from that this spinnaker will cover all angles from 140 and lower in medium conditions. Can be used with a spi-sok for easier handling.

Asymicon

ASSYMETRIC SPINNAKER

Gennaker

The asymmetric spinnaker, also referred to as a gennaker is an all-round asymmetric downwind sail with optimized shape and size to make the sail stable for easy sailing. In light winds you may come up as high as 90 TWA, and apart from that this sail will cover all angles from 120 to 160 TWA in medium conditions. Can be used with a spi-sok for easier handling.

Furlstromicon

FURLSTRØM

Light-weight downwind sail

The FurlStrøm design is an Elvstrøm Sails innovation. It is a great cruising sail with the performance close to a gennaker and the handling of a genoa. It is characterized by a flat cut and straight luff for better pointing and with a complete furling system for easy handling. The FurlStrøm comes complete with a high-quality furling system.

 

Furlstromxlicon

FURLSTRØM XL

“Top down – furling genaker”

The Furlstrøm XL is a Gennaker that furls around an anti-torsion cable outside the sail, attached to the cable in top and to a swiveling tack arrangement in the bottom of the furling unit. It furls from the top and down.
It can be used at the same angles as a cruising gennaker. It has a slightly smaller head angle for better furling.

Bluewaterrunner

BLUE-WATER RUNNER

Twin furling sail

The Blue Water Runner is a twin furling downwind sail, which is easy to furl away from the safety of the cockpit. The sail is a 3-in-1 solution, working not only as a twin furling downwind-runner, but also as an ultra-light genoa and a reacher.

 

Code

A code sail fills the gap between the headsail and the pure downwind sails.

The code can “replace” the engine in light breeze and give the boat high speed under effortless sailing on broad reach in medium breeze. The code sail family is a large one. Common for all of them is that they are set while they are furled in, and when they are up you unfurl and sail away. Before dousing, you furl the sail in, and in this way the handling is very easy.

Code sails can be delivered with an Anti-torsion cable in the luff, and some of these sails can be left hoisted if they have a UV-cover. Cable free code sails are also popular, and they cover a larger range of wind angles since they have a positive luff curve that also take them partly in to the asymmetric family of sails. The cable free code sails shall have the luff tight when they are furled in, and slightly eased when sailing.

Code sails can be delivered in various materials, from EPEX via radial laminated to radial woven materials. The higher Apparent Wind Speed they will be exposed for, the more you wish to have material that does not stretch.

So EPEX is the best material for a code sail built to go upwind and on larger boats, at the same time as a woven polyester sail can be the right material for a large cable free code.

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Code Sails with cable and cable-free

Multipurposecode

MULTIPURPOSE CODE

A low-budget code sail

The multipurpose code is a low-budget code sail, that however still works in a big variations of wind angles. It is easy to handle as you hoist it furled around a cable sewn into the luff. Unfurl and sail away. The sail is built from woven polyester.

Codepermanenthoist

CODE PERMANENT HOIST

UV protected code sail

The UV-protected Code Permanent hoist is designed to stay up and ready for use all the time. The sail can be hoisted in the harbor and can then be left up all day long, overnight, and even for weeks while on your way. The sail has a high clew for better downwind performance and visibility at sea. The sail is used on an Anti-Torsion cable and the furling system is bottom/up.

 

Code Cruise 53

CODE ZERO CRUISE 53%

Cruising code zero 53 %

Comfort, easy handling, and power. You hoist this sail furled on its own luff Anti-Torsion cable. Un-furl the sail and instantly you power the boat up and make it go. The Cruising code is designed so you can prepare and hoist the sail in the harbor before you head out. When you finish using the sail, you furl it away and return to your mooring and take the sail down. You will be able to use the sail in angles between 70° TWA to 150° TWA depending on the wind speed.

Code 65

CODE ZERO 65%

Code Zero 65% - larger cruising code / rating optimized code

The code Zero is the missing link between your up- and downwind sails. It comes in different designs, suited optimally to the rating-/class rules and the rest of your sail inventory. It will be a lightweight sail that is set flying, furled on an anti-torsion cable in the luff which makes it quick to set and retrieve. The sail is designed to work optimally in angles between 70° TWA to 110° TWA depending on the wind speed.

Raceupwind55

CODE RACE UPWIND 55%

Code Race upwind 55 %

The racing Code Zero is the missing link between your up- and downwind sails. It comes in different designs, suited optimally to the rating-/class rules and the rest of your sail inventory. It will be a lightweight sail that is set flying, furled on an anti-torsion cable in the luff which makes it quick to set and retrieve. Produced in the stable EPEX membrane, film on film surface and technora fibers, this sail is designed to work optimally in angles between 50° TWA to 110° TWA depending on the wind speed. Measures in most rules as a headsail.

Cablefreecode 65

CRUSING CABLE-FREE CODE

Cruising cable-free code 65%

A cable-free code sail is designed with a high-density load bearing fiber luff, that replaces the cable. The Cable-free Code Zero is easy to handle and store. With the improved positive luff, you gain wider sailing angles compared to a traditional Code Zero - and more power. It is also a very stable sail to use if sailing butterfly as well, on the opposite side of the main.

Cablefreecode 75

RACING CABLE-FREE CODE

Race cable-free code 75 %

A cable-free code sail is designed with a high-density load bearing fiber luff, that replaces the cable. The Cable-free Code Zero is easy to handle and store. With the improved positive luff, you gain wider sailing angles compared to a traditional Code Zero - and more power. Different rating rules demands different girth measurements on the sail. We will advice you to specify the perfect sail for your boat, rating rule and use.